Ward 3 Voter Guide 2014: Rent control

Do you support city rent stabilization (rent control) in its current form?

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JEFFREY NOEL-NOSBAUM

As a renter in the City, I very much appreciate the current rent stabilization program making it possible for me to afford my own living space.  In general, I support the City’s existing affordable housing programs and would try to make sure that both the needs of landlords and tenants are considered in evaluating and improving the City’s laws and programs going forward.

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ROGER SCHLEGEL

Yes, I essentially support city rent stabilization in its current form. I think we must carefully monitor the program to ensure that it allows for sufficient maintenance and improvement of rental housing, including energy-efficiency improvements; and I think we need to consider additional strategies to increase the inventory of affordable rentals, such as by encouraging the establishment of accessory apartments if the occupants do not increase the burden on available parking.

We also must work with Montgomery and Prince George’s counties to try to ensure that, over time, we do not carry an undue proportion of the burden of providing affordable housing in this part of the metropolitan area. I would not like to see any further conversion of rental apartment buildings to condominiums if such conversion prices lower and moderate income people out of living in Takoma Park.

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KATE STEWART

Yes. We have a very progressive policy and provide over 2000 units of rent-controlled housing. I support this program because it ensures that people with a range of income levels can live in the city. Without rent stabilization, too many people would not be able to afford to live in Takoma Park and it would change the character and uniqueness of the City. I also understand that there is a cost to those who own the units and receive less income and single-family homeowners who property burden is higher because the assessed value of the rent-controlled homes is smaller. While I am supporter of the program, I am also open to examining ways in which we may improve or make changes to the program to benefit the overall community.

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1 Comment on "Ward 3 Voter Guide 2014: Rent control"

  1. I just closed the sale of my rental building. From a Landlord I can tell you that rent control helps no one, and the greatest group hurt by this policy is the renters. Simply put there is no money to maintain a good quality of rental housing, Look around and take your rose colored glasses off, most of the rental housing is falling apart, As an owner for 20 years I can assure you that the lowest income tenant I permitted made over 70k a year. Given the low profit margin one bad tenant causing a great expense would have ruined me. Having a tenant with means to “go after” was a good safe guard. I am moving south by several states with the purchase of a large beach front apartment building. I was struck by the difference in housing rules. For one and the main reason why I am leaving is how inspections are handled. Here it is like a jack booted thug banging at the door, “let us in or we will fine or jail you”. In my new venture if a tenant does not want to give up their constitutional right of search they may refuse an inspector. Units are only allowed to be inspected with tenants consent or when vacant. My last go with Takoma Park not one of my tenants wanted the city to inspect their homes, I had no choice but to allow it without their consent.

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